Of pink marble and porphyry

Recently landed: Of pink marble and porphyry, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) with a Western pygmy possum (Cercartetus concinnus) and Powerful owl (Ninox strenua)

2019 Geelong acquisitive print awards (photo: Andrew Curtis)

2019 Geelong acquisitive print awards

We are delighted that our print, A little palace of pink marble and porphyry, is on display as part of the 2019 Geelong acquisitive print awards until the 24th of November, 2019.

This nationally acclaimed acquisitive prize exhibition features entries from around Australia by established and emerging printmakers representing the diversity of current practice through both traditional printmaking techniques as well as contemporary processes.

36 works by 37 leading and emerging Australian artists have been shortlisted for the 2019 Geelong acquisitive print awards.⁠ Showcasing diverse contemporary Australian printmaking practice, the acquisitive awards and biennial exhibition will feature works by Alison Alder, Rosalind Atkins, GW Bot, Susanna Castleden, Tony Coleing, Christine Courcier-Jones, Marian Crawford, Phil Day, Marieke Dench, Clive Dickson, Dianne Fogwell, Graham Fransella, David Frazer, Silvi Glattauer, Jackie Gorring, Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison, Rew Hanks, Kyoko Imazu, Locust Jones, Martin King, Barbie Kjar, Steve Lopes, Tim Maguire, Marion Manifold, Jordan Marani, Laith McGregor, Glenn Morgan, Stieg Persson, Brian Robinson, Teho Ropeyarn, Jonas Ropponen, John Ryrie, Heather Shimmen, Ruth Stanton, Anne Starling, and Joel Wolter.⁠

Congratulations to 2019 Geelong acquisitive print awards winning artists:
  — Teho Ropeyarn winner of the Geelong acquisitive print award of $5,000 
  — Brian Robinson winner of the Ursula Hoff Institute award of $5,000
  — Marian Crawford winner of a 5–day printmaking residency at Queenscliff Gallery & Workshop

The selection panel for the 2019 Geelong acquisitive print awards included Danny Lacy (Senior Curator, Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery), Trent Walter (Director, Negative Press), and Lisa Sullivan (Senior Curator, Geelong Gallery).


2019 Geelong acquisitive print awards

Friday 20th September – Sunday 24th November, 2019
Geelong Gallery
Little Malop Street, Geelong

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, A little palace of pink marble and porphyry, lithograph with hand-colouring. Image drawn directly on to the lithographic plates by the Artists and processed, proofed and printed in two colours from two plates, by APW Printer Martin King and hand-coloured by the Artists, at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, 2019.

Zarafa

Recently landed: Zarafa, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) features the Other Worlds 2019 Short story competition responses to our print And Zarafa Kept Walking

Study of the Giraffe Given to Charles X by the Viceroy of Egypt, Nicolas Huet II, 1827

As soon as we met

Recently landed: As soon as we met, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) introduces you to the newest member of the menagerie, Arthur

He arrived, officially, as our sixth RSPCA foster cat, under the name of Lee, just before Easter. He arrived, as Arthur, more like, and settled in to his new forever home just before Easter.

Stamping Ground

Recently landed: Stamping Ground, Gracia’s written response to Sylvia presented by The Australian Ballet, for Fjord Review

In Stamping Ground, choreographed by Jiří Kylián in 1983, before Bangarra Dance Theatre was sparking, Bangarra presents a work they were always meant to perform. The first work the company have presented by a non-Indigenous artist, as artistic director Stephen Page remarked, they waited for the “right time for Stamping Ground to come back to its cultural roots.” Seeing Lillian Banks, Baden Hitchcock, Rika Hamaguchi, Ella Havelka, Tyrel Dulvarie, and Ryan Pearson embody every part of this homage, its spirit, with their own spirit and ‘bring it home’ is an absolute joy.

Stamping Ground sprang from Kylián’s “experience in 1980, when he and his colleagues worked with communities and organizations to arrange a large corroboree on Groote Eylandt in the Gulf of Carpentaria . . . . Over a thousand indigenous men, women and children from all over the country, including the Kimberley, Cape York and central desert lands travelled . . . . to attend the week-long event.” In the documentary that resulted, Road to the Stamping Ground, Kylián remarked, “dance is absolutely tied with nature here. It cannot be separated.” In the excerpt which screens before Stamping Ground, Kylián continues, for “the dancers here, it is part of their life. They cannot divide their normal life and dancing life; their normal life is dancing, and dancing is part of their normal life. I think there is not another culture which has this melting of private life and dance like they have it here.”

Stamping Ground draws inspiration from the expressive use of hands and moves derived from the movement of animals. From the “hundreds of different ways of walking,” depending on the animal, be it an emu or a kangaroo, or the significance of the dance. It draws on the “phenomenal way of jumping without preparation—they are already in the ground and a spring releases and they are in the air and you don’t know how it happened—” and on the use and importance of counter moves to give length to the movement, so that as one part of body reaches one way, another part reaches the other way and in doing so it “prolongs the drive of the movement.” From his own understanding, in his own vocabulary, working from “the point of view of inspiration not imitation or theft,” in Stamping Ground you see movement dropping “down like lightening”.

Bangarra Dance Theatre’s Courtney Radford, Tyrel Dulvarie, and Gusta Mara performing in to make fire (image credit: Daniel Boud)

“In the heavens for all eternity”

Recently landed: “In the heavens for all eternity”, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes you to Stanton Welch’s Sylvia

Artists of The Australian Ballet in Stanton Welch’s Sylvia, 2019 (image credit: Jeff Busby)

Melody and Mythology

Recently landed: Melody and Mythology, Gracia’s written response to Sylvia presented by The Australian Ballet, for Fjord Review

I have long wished to swim through the other-worlds created by Georges Méliès, and Stanton Welch’s Sylvia, a co-production between Houston Ballet and the Australian Ballet, gives me the opportunity to do just that; to submerge myself in a fantastical landscape that delights in the play of model making and storytelling; in how we tell a story and the story itself. Theatrical and larger than life.

To me, the beauty of Méliès’ 1903 film, The Kingdom of the Fairies (Le Royaume des Fées), is derived in equal measure from the magical figures that appear to swim and the visibility of the harness around their forms that lets the performers achieve this sensation. I love the aquatic underworld Méliès has created for the detectable mechanics of his illusions as much as the effect of the creative illusions themselves. It is the freedom to dream while still being tethered to the practicalities of a set. It is the tension between the trick and how it is done, and between character and performer, and by extension between fairy and human, god and mortal that draws parallels between Sylvia and The Kingdom of the Fairies.

Both permit me one stage-front perspective. The painted grotto in The Kingdom is outward facing. (The camera doesn’t weave through the landscape as lighter and smaller technology permits now, rather it is before a stage in which elements roll in from the left and right, and curtains of landscape lift and lower to create movement and depth of field.) My mind knows that the grotto is a façade that if viewed from behind it would reveal the raw timber support. The very essence of this magic trick from over a century ago is in Sylvia. Indeed, both feature a painted grotto, and projections not so very different in reach. Where Méliès gives us a layered collage of fish swimming over the scene in order to suggest water, Wendall K. Harrington gives us projections onto the interchangeable surfaces of Jérôme Kaplan’s set design.

Robyn Hendricks and Adam Bull in Sylvia by Stanton Welch (image credit: Jeff Busby)

MIFF 2019, from present to past tense

Recently landed: MIFF 2019, from present to past tense, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) unspools forty-four films seen over seventeen days

Nissrine Erradi and Lubna Azabal, in a scene from Maryam Touzani’s Adam (2019)

Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions from the Moreland Art Collection

We are delighted that our artists’ book, Salvaged Relatives, edition III will be on display.

In recent years the Moreland Art Collection has experienced significant gains through purchases, commissions and a marked increase in the receipt of philanthropic donations.

Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions from the Moreland Art Collection draws together artworks held by the municipality not previously exhibited at the Counihan Gallery In Brunswick.

Comprising photography, painting, drawing, prints, collage, artists books and mixed media the artworks reflect a diverse range of contemporary practice as well as some fascinating historical offerings — a trove of cultural heritage for the City of Moreland.

Charles Blackman, Trevor ‘Turbo’ Brown, Noel Counihan, Julian Di Martino, Gabrielle de Vietri, Rennie Ellis, Helga Groves, Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Joy Hester, Deanna Hitti, Janelle Low, Kirsten Lyttle, Jordan Marani, Jill Orr, Louise Paramour, Wolfgang Sievers, Shaun Tan, Stephanie Valentin, Stephen Wickham, James Wigley


Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions from the Moreland Art Collection

Saturday 27th July – Sunday 18th August, 2019
Counihan Gallery In Brunswick
233 Sydney Road, Brunswick

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison
Salvaged Relatives, edition III
2014–2015
Artists’ book, unique state, featuring 21 individual collages on cabinet cards with pencil and paint additions (by Gracia Haby)
Housed in a three-colour cloth Solander box (by Louise Jennison) with inlaid collage, In the borrowed costume of a Polovtsian warrior (Prince Igor c. 1909–37)

Salvaged Relatives

Recently landed: Salvaged Relatives, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes a look back at an artists’ book soon to be on display as part of Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions from the Moreland Art Collection

Iurii Annenkov, La Nijinska, Ballet Russes (Poster for Les Biches and Le Train Bleu created by Bronislava Nijinska for the Ballet Russes), 1924, lithograph with hand additions

Other Worlds 2019 Short story competition

Our print, And Zarafa Kept Walking, from 2013 is one of two artworks you can write or recite a story in response to, as part of the Other Worlds: 2019 Short story competition. Entries close Sunday the 21st of July, 2019.

Moreland City Libraries’ Short story competition

Writers of all ages are welcome to enter Moreland City Libraries’ Other Worlds 2019 Short story competition. Your story can be written in 500 words (or less) OR recited in 5 minutes (or less)

To enter, complete a Short story competition entry form (PDF 1Mb) or obtain one from your local library.
Contact
Moreland City Council
Moreland City Libraries
readmore@moreland.vic.gov.au

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison,   And Zarafa Kept Walking  , 2013, four-colour lithographic offset print on Fabriano Artistico 300gsm traditional white hot-press paper, 33cm X 23cm

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, And Zarafa Kept Walking, 2013, four-colour lithographic offset print on Fabriano Artistico 300gsm traditional white hot-press paper, 33cm X 23cm

Near to the lake’s edge

Recently landed: Near to the lake’s edge, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes you to Jean-Christophe Maillot’s LAC

Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo in LAC by Jean-Christophe Maillot (image credit: Alice Blangero)

Light and Shade

Recently landed: Light and Shade, Gracia’s written response to LAC presented by The Australian Ballet, for Fjord Review

A bevy of black swans circled our car parked near to the lake’s edge. It was my first encounter with a black swan, nose to beak, separated only by a wind-up wind-down window pane. I would have been no taller than one of the swans, had I’ve been out of the car. I remember feeling awestruck by their scale, their very presence. And yet as I was four-years-of-age, or thereabouts, is this a later addition stitched to a memory derived from family folklore? My Mum recalled one of the swans hopped up on the car’s bonnet, but wonders now if such a spectacle is likely. A small car buried beneath a mountain of feathered bodies, it is almost a cartoon image — better yet, a cinematic one — when viewed from a human perspective. In territorial union to our intrusion, the swans rallied, and looped for me a definitive impression of swans, lakes, and Tchaikovsky.

The swans of my memory and family folklore were not so unlike the hissing, awe-inspiring Chimeras within Jean-Christophe Maillot’s
LAC, a modern telling of Swan Lake, performed with attack by the renowned Ballets de Monte-Carlo. Imposing, glorious, memorable.

In
LAC, Maillot, together with writer Jean Rouaud, resurrected “these buried experiences”, albeit against a more “Machiavellian, family backdrop …. to present a ballet of contrasts. The change from animal into human being infuse[d] the entire work and question[ed] our own nature. We believe that we differ from animals because of our ability to make choices. But is this all we are capable of? …. Perhaps our humanity ultimately lies in this unsophisticated insatiability that defines us from our first cry — We want everything!”

Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo in LAC by Jean-Christophe Maillot (image credit: Alice Blangero)

Small things; precious things

Recently landed: Small things; precious things, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at our contribution to the Black-throated Finch Project

Adani is saying the birds can just fly somewhere else — well, I’m afraid to say there are very few places left for our threatened species to just fly somewhere else, so that’s just a joke.
— Sean Dooley, Birdlife Australia

We created twenty original postcard collages for our contribution to the 2019 Black-throated Finch Project

Like Light

Recently landed: Like Light, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at the installation process of It came like light out of the walls

Cutting into the vinyl pieces and making them into something new was even more enjoyable than we’d expected it to be. We had followed a plan for the top peaks and bottom pools, and allowed our scissors to glide in the middle. And we’ll do it again with what remains. We are so glad we had the chance to make this piece, to reinvent the original printing of Ripples in the Open.

File under ‘Eye’

Recently landed: File under ‘Eye’, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes you on a virtual tour of Through a glass eye at the Australian Print Workshop

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Through a glass eye, at the Australian Print Workshop until Saturday the 29th of June, 2019 (image credit: Tim Gresham)
(This work was produced with APW Printers at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, as part of Australian Print Workshop’s French Connections project curated by APW Director Anne Virgo OAM)

It came like light out of the walls

You’re invited.

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison
It came like light out of the walls
and
Kyoko Imazu
In the Neighbourhood

Thursday 13th June – Sunday 21st of July, 2019
West Gallery Thebarton
32 West Thebarton Road, Thebarton, South Australia

If you live nearby or are passing through, please call in to explore our collage with your own eyes. And should you feel inclined, please share an image or two (#Itcamelikelightoutofthewalls).

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison_It came like light out of the walls_62.jpg
“The stability of nature can no longer be taken for granted”

Recently landed: “The stability of nature can no longer be taken for granted”, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at our functioning (or not) ecosystem on the page as part of our forthcoming exhibition, It came like light out of the walls

A Pacific walrus rests at the top of steep cliffs in Russia, still from ‘Frozen Worlds’ episode, Our Planet, 2019 (image credit: Sophie Lanfear/Silverback/Netflix)